The Importance of Communication in Code Enforcement

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Providing high-quality service depends on a commitment to consistency and enhanced communication.  The basic process shared by most regulatory industries are incident response, inspection, and follow-up/enforcement activity. Effective code compliance and enforcement depends on how well these systems work together to produce an amenable outcome for all interested parties and communicating that outcome. Many code enforcement operations focus on compliance, with enforcement as a tool, but sometimes, statutory procedures, administrative processes, weak or non-existing codes, or simply misinterpretation presents a host of challenges; this fact must be communicated.

In order to create a climate where successful communication can take place, those in leadership must themselves possess a clear understanding of the goals, strategies, and services of the municipality and code operation, and be willing to take the necessary steps to achieve these goals. If the code enforcement operation makes internal communications a priority, there will more likely be motivated officers who are inspired to help the community reach its objectives, resolve conflicts quickly and improve resident relations. Credibility is an important area to focus on when it comes to influencing effective communication between officers and residents. When executed correctly, communication with residents reinforces trustworthiness, but if there is a deep communication gap, it can ultimately undermine productivity and engagement. The general public expectation is that it is possible that a quick and positive response to all requests for assistance from various public institutions should always be forthcoming. To bridge the gap, communication by code enforcement staff must be ongoing using all modern methods.

Published by Marcus Kellum

Emerging Leader and Consummate Professional.

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